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P03 9531 6812

A63b Ormond Esplanade, Elwood

Essentially kindergarten is about acquiring life skills. It is about fostering a joy of learning, it is about celebrating children's achievements, it is about socialisation, it is about building self-esteem.

Philosophy

The educational philosophy of Lady Forster Kindergarten helps parents, new staff and new Committee members understand the particular nature of this kindergarten. We hope that it will clarify what kindergarten is about and what your children are experiencing, and that it might give you some ideas for following up on what they are learning and experiencing for when they are at home.

 

Essentially kindergarten is about acquiring life skills. It is about fostering a joy of learning, it is about celebrating children's achievements, it is about socialisation, it is about building self-esteem.

 

To achieve these aims, early learning should be:

  • Active plenty of hands-on involvement, rather than assuming passive receipt of knowledge or information or activity by the child.
  • Personally meaningful capitalises on what the children are interested in doing.
  • Experimental plans for learning by doing, talking, experimenting.
  • Exploratory invites possibilities, delights in curiosity as a key motivator.
  • Developmentally appropriate carefully suited to the age and stage of each child.
  • Pro-social provides for appropriate interaction and stresses co-operation rather than competition.
  • Creative encourages children to be inventive and imaginative.
  • Process-orientated recognises the need to help children through complex processes in steps and stages.
  • Integrated holistic, not broken down into meaningless sub-skills.
  • Rigorous stresses child responsibility, initiative and commitment, is conceptually developing and moving toward higher-order thought processes.

 

Artwork, Made Things

We believe in the value of processes and experience, discovery and experiment, i.e. a hands-on approach. It is more important that children enjoy the process of painting, drawing, etc. than they have a product to bring home. But of course, if having a finished product is something that is important to them, we will accord it due respect.

 

Modelling

We are keenly aware that staff attitudes and actions will be imitated by the children. A large part of our work is achieved through positive language and actions. Some examples of what we model each day:

  • respect for all individuals, child or adult.
  • patience in the face of frustration.
  • enthusiasm for activities (we join in with the children, share their excitement and discoveries).
  • we explain our behaviour and acknowledge our mistakes.
  • we explore options, verbally and physically.
  • we work together to choose preferred behaviour rather than having hard and fast rules, e.g. two children carrying a bucket, one appropriately and one inappropriately. The staff would focus on positive reinforcement, praising the child who is doing it the right way."I really like the way Johnny is carrying that bucket."

 

Concentration

Adults tend to interrupt children and break their concentration because they do not believe or are unaware that what the child is doing is important i.e. building blocks, mud-pie making. We endeavour to always respect a child's current activity and negotiate a suitable time for moving on thereby fostering lengthening periods of concentration, one of the hardest life skills to acquire.

 

Conflict Resolution We encourage children to verbally communicate and negotiate their needs. Strategies, like peer group discussions and re-direction, are Policies employed by staff to encourage the children to find a way to resolve their problems with each other. 

 

Policies

Copies of our Policies are available from the Office.